Hearing Aids Have Changed Dramatically in the Last Few Years

If you haven’t thought about hearing aids since your great grandfather wore one to your violin recital, you might be shocked at how much they’ve changed. In fact, hearing aids have changed so much in the last few years many of our clients tend not to think of them as just hearing aids. Not only are hearing aids far more discreet (with some of them being completely hidden in the ear canal), but they use sophisticated artificial intelligence (AI) and bluetooth which add a whole other level of sound quality, clarity and, frankly, usefulness. Time was that you couldn’t use hearing aids with telephones. Now digital hearing aids will synch right to your smartphone.

Here are just a few of the amazing advances in hearing-aid technology:

  • Bluetooth features that sync with your TV, phone and other smart devices.
  • Biometric tracking abilities, so you can replace your fitness tracker device, or even your alert pendant. (Some hearing aids are even able to detect falls in case you’re unable to call for help.)
  • Artificial intelligence, so you can filter out noise to focus on the music or voice you want to hear.
  • Translation capabilities—yes, this is new technology, but pretty amazing, especially if you enjoy traveling.
  • Waterproof hearing aids that allow you to swim with them.
  • More comfortable, extended-wear options.

New digital hearing aids have also solved many of the complaints of earlier hearing aid devices such as eliminating the “voice-in-a-barrel” effect and cancelling out feedback (that annoying screeching noise).

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss is fairly common and might explain why you can hear a pin drop, but not be able to make out what your partner is saying. You’re born with tiny hairs called cilia in your inner ear that move when sound waves are present. Nerves translate the movement of these tiny hairs into information that goes to your brain where it gets interpreted into distinct sounds and frequencies.

The better the movements are interpreted, the more easily you’re able to hear distinctions between sounds such as “D” and “T” or hear letters like “S”, “H” and “F”. Unfortunately, the cilia are extremely delicate and can be harmed by loud noise or other trauma.

Cilia also help your brain determine how loud a sound is, where it’s coming from, and how far away it is.

The Most Common Causes of Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss happens when these tiny hairs are damaged. Often, this type of hearing loss is gradual, which is why many people associate it with aging. It’s thought that animals are able to regrow these hairs and regain their hearing when their cilia get damaged, but humans don’t seem to have this ability naturally.

Common causes of sensorineural hearing loss are:

Loud sounds
Head injuries or other trauma
Diseases like diabetes or autoimmune disease
High blood pressure
Some medications
How to Deal with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
While there are no current medical treatments to heal cilia, you can successfully address sensorineural hearing loss with hearing technology such as hearing aids.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

What’s the difference between digital hearing aids and analog?

Back in the day, there were only analog hearing aids, which are essentially amplifying devices. Similar to digital hearing aids, they have a tiny microphone, a receiver and a component designed to make sounds louder. But that’s where the comparison ends, because digital hearing aids also have a microchip, which makes them akin to tiny computers. Many of the amazing benefits listed above are only possible with digital hearing aids including:

  • Automatically focus on voices (instead of noise)
  • Cancel out that screeching feedback sound older models sometimes made
  • Connect to other devices
  • Discern between situations where you’d want to focus on one sound (like talking to a waiter in a restaurant) versus situations where you’d want to hear every note (like at a rock concert)

What this means is that digital hearing aids offer a sound quality much closer to your natural hearing. Is it any wonder why most people prefer digital hearing aids?

Don't wait!

Early treatment is the most effective treatment.

Talk to the experts. Call us today.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss is fairly common and might explain why you can hear a pin drop, but not be able to make out what your partner is saying. You’re born with tiny hairs called cilia in your inner ear that move when sound waves are present. Nerves translate the movement of these tiny hairs into information that goes to your brain where it gets interpreted into distinct sounds and frequencies.

The better the movements are interpreted, the more easily you’re able to hear distinctions between sounds such as “D” and “T” or hear letters like “S”, “H” and “F”. Unfortunately, the cilia are extremely delicate and can be harmed by loud noise or other trauma.

Cilia also help your brain determine how loud a sound is, where it’s coming from, and how far away it is.

The Most Common Causes of Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss happens when these tiny hairs are damaged. Often, this type of hearing loss is gradual, which is why many people associate it with aging. It’s thought that animals are able to regrow these hairs and regain their hearing when their cilia get damaged, but humans don’t seem to have this ability naturally.

Common causes of sensorineural hearing loss are:

Loud sounds
Head injuries or other trauma
Diseases like diabetes or autoimmune disease
High blood pressure
Some medications
How to Deal with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
While there are no current medical treatments to heal cilia, you can successfully address sensorineural hearing loss with hearing technology such as hearing aids.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Which Type of Hearing Aid is Right for You?

Below are the most common hearing aid styles. Come in and talk to us to find out which might work for your hearing loss.

Behind the Ear (BTE) Hearing Aids

This type of hearing aid can be beneficial for people of all ages and degrees of hearing loss.

BTE hearing aids are designed to give your ears an incredible boost in power. The hard plastic casing fits directly behind the top of your ear in a place where it is easily hidden by your hair.

The custom earmold is shaped to match the exact contours of your ear canal, and can be ordered in a variety of colors including clear, pink, and tan to decrease visibility even more. The BTE has a wide variety of programming features and options which may be customized to meet your hearing needs.

In the Canal (IC) Hearing Aids

Our IC hearing aids are our smallest, most invisible custom hearing aid products. These amplification devices are designed to fit snug into your ear canal. The hard plastic casing is tiny, ranging anywhere between 1-3 cm long. It’s just that small!

The Completely in the Canal (CIC) hearing aids are even smaller. These are designed to fit even deeper into the ear canal resulting in a really invisible fit closer to the ear drum. CICs come with standard features and may have wireless capability. Both styles of hearing aids are beneficial for individuals with mild to moderately severe hearing losses.

In the Ear (ITE) Hearing Aids

This type of hearing aid is especially helpful for individuals with disabilities or dexterity challenges and can meet the hearing needs of individuals with mild to severe hearing losses.

ITE hearing aids are true custom-designed hearing aids in which the entire hearing aid is molded to match the contours of your outer ear. It provides great amplification and you won’t have to worry about this hearing aid slipping off or falling out. The hard plastic casing forms to the exact shape of your ear making a nice and snug fit.

Many features may be added to this hearing aid to make it hassle free including telecoil, ear to ear communication and automatic programming. The ITE hearing aid may be ordered in a variety of colors to match your skin tone including pink, beige, cocoa and brown.

Extended Wear Hearing Aids

Think invisible and almost maintenance free! This type of hearing aid combines the concealment of our in-the-canal hearing aids with the ultimate convenience of extended wear.

These hearing aids can be worn for 24 hours/day for months at a time, without having to worry about charging or replacing the batteries. This style is best suited for those with mild to moderately severe hearing loss, and the close proximity of the hearing aids to the eardrum ensures optimal sound while reducing distortion and background noise.

Receiver in the Ear (RIC) Hearing Aids

This type of hearing aid can easily be tailored to meet the needs of individuals with mild to severe hearing losses.

Our RIC hearing aids are perfect for the active adult. The directional microphone technology makes it easier to understand conversations in crowded environments by detecting and amplifying the target speech signal and decreasing the background noise.

Visibility isn’t a problem. You can attend business meetings, parties and other social events without anyone even knowing that you are wearing hearing aids. The small hard plastic casing on this device is often hidden behind the ear or underneath your hair.

The ultra-thin wire picks up sound and carries it directly into a speaker which fits invisibly into the ear canal. The RIC hearing aid can come with many programming features including telecoil, automatic programming, volume or programming controls and alert signals. It can also come with accessories which activate the bluetooth compatibility. With bluetooth, you can easily connect your RIC hearing aids to your phone, your iPad or even your car.

Special Hearing Aid Features

Many of our devices come with special programming features including noise management programs, automatic adjustments, ear to ear communication, function controls, directional microphones, wireless bluetooth controls, music programs and telecoil. These features help make communication much easier. The telecoil feature is also useful in public facilities with induction loop systems. Consult with our hearing professionals to determine which features are best for you!

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss is fairly common and might explain why you can hear a pin drop, but not be able to make out what your partner is saying. You’re born with tiny hairs called cilia in your inner ear that move when sound waves are present. Nerves translate the movement of these tiny hairs into information that goes to your brain where it gets interpreted into distinct sounds and frequencies.

The better the movements are interpreted, the more easily you’re able to hear distinctions between sounds such as “D” and “T” or hear letters like “S”, “H” and “F”. Unfortunately, the cilia are extremely delicate and can be harmed by loud noise or other trauma.

Cilia also help your brain determine how loud a sound is, where it’s coming from, and how far away it is.

The Most Common Causes of Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss happens when these tiny hairs are damaged. Often, this type of hearing loss is gradual, which is why many people associate it with aging. It’s thought that animals are able to regrow these hairs and regain their hearing when their cilia get damaged, but humans don’t seem to have this ability naturally.

Common causes of sensorineural hearing loss are:

Loud sounds
Head injuries or other trauma
Diseases like diabetes or autoimmune disease
High blood pressure
Some medications
How to Deal with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
While there are no current medical treatments to heal cilia, you can successfully address sensorineural hearing loss with hearing technology such as hearing aids.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Are Assistive Listening Devices the Solution?

A range of assistive listening devices is available to help people with distinctive hearing needs. They fall into these general categories:

  • Assistive listening devices (ALDs) help amplify the sounds you want to hear, especially where there’s a lot of background noise. ALDs can be used with a hearing aid or cochlear implant to help a wearer hear certain sounds better.
  • Augmentative and alternative communication devices (AAC) help people with communication disorders to express themselves. These devices can range from a simple picture board to a computer program that synthesizes speech from text.
  • Alerting devices connect to a doorbell, telephone, or alarm that emits a loud sound or blinking light to let someone with hearing loss know that an event is taking place.

Assistive listening devices typically use a microphone to capture an audio source near its origin and broadcast it wirelessly to over an FM (Frequency Modulation) transmission, IR (Infra Red) transmission, IL (Induction Loop) transmission or other transmission method.

FM systems use radio signals to transmit amplified sounds up to 300 feet. That makes them useful in many public places such as classrooms, where the instructor wears a small microphone connected to a transmitter and the student listens via a worn receiver, which is tuned to a specific frequency or channel.

Infrared systems use infrared light to transmit sound. Unlike induction loop or FM systems, the infrared systems signal cannot pass through walls, making it particularly useful in courtrooms, where confidential information is often discussed, and in buildings where competing signals can be a problem, such as classrooms or movie theaters. However, infrared systems cannot be used in environments with too many competing light sources, such as outdoors or in strongly lit rooms.

Personal amplifiers are useful in places where the above systems are unavailable or when watching TV, being outdoors or traveling in a car. About the size of a cell phone, these devices increase sound levels and reduce background noise for a listener. Some have directional microphones that can be angled toward a speaker or other source of sound. As with other ALDs, the amplified sound can be picked up by a receiver that the listener is wearing, either as a headset or as earbuds.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss is fairly common and might explain why you can hear a pin drop, but not be able to make out what your partner is saying. You’re born with tiny hairs called cilia in your inner ear that move when sound waves are present. Nerves translate the movement of these tiny hairs into information that goes to your brain where it gets interpreted into distinct sounds and frequencies.

The better the movements are interpreted, the more easily you’re able to hear distinctions between sounds such as “D” and “T” or hear letters like “S”, “H” and “F”. Unfortunately, the cilia are extremely delicate and can be harmed by loud noise or other trauma.

Cilia also help your brain determine how loud a sound is, where it’s coming from, and how far away it is.

The Most Common Causes of Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss happens when these tiny hairs are damaged. Often, this type of hearing loss is gradual, which is why many people associate it with aging. It’s thought that animals are able to regrow these hairs and regain their hearing when their cilia get damaged, but humans don’t seem to have this ability naturally.

Common causes of sensorineural hearing loss are:

Loud sounds
Head injuries or other trauma
Diseases like diabetes or autoimmune disease
High blood pressure
Some medications
How to Deal with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
While there are no current medical treatments to heal cilia, you can successfully address sensorineural hearing loss with hearing technology such as hearing aids.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

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