Tinnitus Information

Are you hearing a ringing sound, white noise, or clicking in your ears? You may be among the 50 million Americans each year suffering from tinnitus. Tinnitus can even sound like wind or crackling. Because it’s constant, tinnitus can be extremely distracting and may keep you awake at night. Despite all the hype you may have heard on social media, there is no cure for tinnitus. However, there are many ways to manage it successfully so you can sleep better and go back to enjoying quiet moments.

What’s Causing Your Tinnitus?

Tinnitus is often associated with hearing loss or can occur after concerts or other extended loud noise. However, tinnitus can also be a side effect of medication, allergies, high blood pressure or other health conditions. Uncovering the root cause of your tinnitus will help you find the best treatment for you, so you may be referred to a physician to rule out medical issues.

    Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

    Sensorineural Hearing Loss
    Sensorineural hearing loss is fairly common and might explain why you can hear a pin drop, but not be able to make out what your partner is saying. You’re born with tiny hairs called cilia in your inner ear that move when sound waves are present. Nerves translate the movement of these tiny hairs into information that goes to your brain where it gets interpreted into distinct sounds and frequencies.

    The better the movements are interpreted, the more easily you’re able to hear distinctions between sounds such as “D” and “T” or hear letters like “S”, “H” and “F”. Unfortunately, the cilia are extremely delicate and can be harmed by loud noise or other trauma.

    Cilia also help your brain determine how loud a sound is, where it’s coming from, and how far away it is.

    The Most Common Causes of Sensorineural Hearing Loss
    Sensorineural hearing loss happens when these tiny hairs are damaged. Often, this type of hearing loss is gradual, which is why many people associate it with aging. It’s thought that animals are able to regrow these hairs and regain their hearing when their cilia get damaged, but humans don’t seem to have this ability naturally.

    Common causes of sensorineural hearing loss are:

    Loud sounds
    Head injuries or other trauma
    Diseases like diabetes or autoimmune disease
    High blood pressure
    Some medications
    How to Deal with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
    While there are no current medical treatments to heal cilia, you can successfully address sensorineural hearing loss with hearing technology such as hearing aids.

    Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

    Tinnitus Therapy

    How Do I Stop the Constant Ringing in My Ears?

    Make an appointment for with us for an audiometric hearing test to determine whether hearing aids can help. We may refer you to an ear, nose and throat (ENT) doctor or other specialist to complete your diagnosis.

    Until we identify whether hearing aids may alleviate your symptoms, avoid things that appear to make your tinnitus worse. If you are regularly exposed to loud noise through your work or home environment, make sure you have adequate hearing protection. If you’re taking medications, check the side effects and if they are known to cause tinnitus consult your doctor to see if an alternative treatment would be a better option for you.

    Types of Tinnitus Treatment

    After getting the results of your audiometric tests, you may want to consult your physician to evaluate the following treatment options.

     

    • Hearing Aids—Hearing aids create a dual benefit of enhancing hearing and masking or covering up the tinnitus. The majority of patients with tinnitus receive partial or complete relief from their tinnitus with the use of hearing aids.
    • Maskers—Tinnitus maskers are small electronic devices that look like hearing aids and are tuned to generate sound that masks or covers up the tinnitus.
    • Drug Therapy—Certain medicines may provide some relief from tinnitus. Nutritional supplements may also provide additional relief.
    • Allergy Treatment—Allergies can exacerbate tinnitus. If you test positive for allergies treatment can have the dual effect of reducing the ringing in your ears and giving you a big boost in energy.

     

     Discover Whether Hearing Aids Are a Good Option for You. Call Us Today

     

    Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

    Sensorineural Hearing Loss
    Sensorineural hearing loss is fairly common and might explain why you can hear a pin drop, but not be able to make out what your partner is saying. You’re born with tiny hairs called cilia in your inner ear that move when sound waves are present. Nerves translate the movement of these tiny hairs into information that goes to your brain where it gets interpreted into distinct sounds and frequencies.

    The better the movements are interpreted, the more easily you’re able to hear distinctions between sounds such as “D” and “T” or hear letters like “S”, “H” and “F”. Unfortunately, the cilia are extremely delicate and can be harmed by loud noise or other trauma.

    Cilia also help your brain determine how loud a sound is, where it’s coming from, and how far away it is.

    The Most Common Causes of Sensorineural Hearing Loss
    Sensorineural hearing loss happens when these tiny hairs are damaged. Often, this type of hearing loss is gradual, which is why many people associate it with aging. It’s thought that animals are able to regrow these hairs and regain their hearing when their cilia get damaged, but humans don’t seem to have this ability naturally.

    Common causes of sensorineural hearing loss are:

    Loud sounds
    Head injuries or other trauma
    Diseases like diabetes or autoimmune disease
    High blood pressure
    Some medications
    How to Deal with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
    While there are no current medical treatments to heal cilia, you can successfully address sensorineural hearing loss with hearing technology such as hearing aids.

    Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

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