Why Should I Address My Hearing Loss?

What are the long-term effects of ignoring your hearing loss? It’s worse than you think. At first hearing loss may be easy to ignore, especially if it’s gradual….you might think my ears are clogged today or it’ll get better when the allergy season is over. Maybe you think your wife is speaking too softly or that traffic was too loud to hear your phone on the street. Or maybe you keep telling yourself it just isn’t that bad. Whatever is keeping you from seeking help, you should know that not taking hearing loss seriously can have some seriously bad effects on your overall health.

Don’t Ignore Hearing Loss. Call Us.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss is fairly common and might explain why you can hear a pin drop, but not be able to make out what your partner is saying. You’re born with tiny hairs called cilia in your inner ear that move when sound waves are present. Nerves translate the movement of these tiny hairs into information that goes to your brain where it gets interpreted into distinct sounds and frequencies.

The better the movements are interpreted, the more easily you’re able to hear distinctions between sounds such as “D” and “T” or hear letters like “S”, “H” and “F”. Unfortunately, the cilia are extremely delicate and can be harmed by loud noise or other trauma.

Cilia also help your brain determine how loud a sound is, where it’s coming from, and how far away it is.

The Most Common Causes of Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss happens when these tiny hairs are damaged. Often, this type of hearing loss is gradual, which is why many people associate it with aging. It’s thought that animals are able to regrow these hairs and regain their hearing when their cilia get damaged, but humans don’t seem to have this ability naturally.

Common causes of sensorineural hearing loss are:

Loud sounds
Head injuries or other trauma
Diseases like diabetes or autoimmune disease
High blood pressure
Some medications
How to Deal with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
While there are no current medical treatments to heal cilia, you can successfully address sensorineural hearing loss with hearing technology such as hearing aids.

Don't wait!

Early treatment is the most effective treatment.

Talk to the experts. Call us today.

Research Links Hearing Loss with Other Negative Health Effects

Hearing loss is so easy to ignore, the average person waits seven years before they seek help. What does that kind of delay do to your overall health?

Research has linked hearing loss with:

  • Fatigue
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Dementia and cognitive decline
  • Headaches

Studies have even shown an increased risk of accidents. Yet the most common effect of hearing loss is far more subtle. When you’re not completely part of the conversation, you feel left out. As time goes by you may even start to opt out of social gatherings because you can’t fully participate. Social isolation is not only a side effect of hearing loss, it can also amplify the other effects as social interaction is crucial for cognitive and mental health.

Reversing Negative Effects with Hearing Aids

While the health effects of hearing loss are scary, the good news is that addressing hearing loss can reverse some of these effects. According to research at the University of Texas, participants who used hearing aids were able to significantly recover cognitive ability the longer they wore them. Other studies confirm that hearing aids help fight the side effects of hearing loss and are a good intervention for cognitive decline. Among the cognitive functions tested in these studies, hearing aids helped improve memory function, speech recognition, and speech processing.

Why suffer the effects of hearing loss? Get tested today and to see if you could be helped by a hearing aid.

Don’t Ignore Hearing Loss. Call Us.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss is fairly common and might explain why you can hear a pin drop, but not be able to make out what your partner is saying. You’re born with tiny hairs called cilia in your inner ear that move when sound waves are present. Nerves translate the movement of these tiny hairs into information that goes to your brain where it gets interpreted into distinct sounds and frequencies.

The better the movements are interpreted, the more easily you’re able to hear distinctions between sounds such as “D” and “T” or hear letters like “S”, “H” and “F”. Unfortunately, the cilia are extremely delicate and can be harmed by loud noise or other trauma.

Cilia also help your brain determine how loud a sound is, where it’s coming from, and how far away it is.

The Most Common Causes of Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss happens when these tiny hairs are damaged. Often, this type of hearing loss is gradual, which is why many people associate it with aging. It’s thought that animals are able to regrow these hairs and regain their hearing when their cilia get damaged, but humans don’t seem to have this ability naturally.

Common causes of sensorineural hearing loss are:

Loud sounds
Head injuries or other trauma
Diseases like diabetes or autoimmune disease
High blood pressure
Some medications
How to Deal with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
While there are no current medical treatments to heal cilia, you can successfully address sensorineural hearing loss with hearing technology such as hearing aids.

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