Hearing Aid Fitting

Scheduling a hearing aid fitting is a crucial step to making sure your new hearing aids work properly. Getting a snug fit helps make sure that you don’t hear feedback and helps keep them from falling out.

We’ll also take this time to show you how to insert and remove your hearing aids properly, how to clean them without causing damage to the device, and how to retrain your ears to hear again.

What’s a Hearing Aid Fitting?

Hearing aids are not just earbuds. Getting a proper fitting is akin to getting a prescription for eyeglasses. Your ear is unique. What will fit and be comfortable in your ear canal all day will be different from other people. In addition, hearing aids are programmed to the exact results of your hearing test so they complement your ear’s current hearing ability.

Some types of hearing loss require specific kinds of hearing aids and may require making a mold of your ear so that it sits correctly in the canal. Even if custom molds are not necessary, getting a snug fit will help reduce feedback and issues with comfort.

Live Speech Mapping

Live speech mapping uses a tiny microphone to check how well you hear using your new hearing aids. This unique verification method makes sure your new hearing aids work well in your ear. Bring along a family member—you’ll be able to tell immediately how well your new hearing aids work while listening to their voice.

Get the most from your hearing aid.

Don't wait!

Early treatment is the most effective treatment.

Talk to the experts. Call us today.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss is fairly common and might explain why you can hear a pin drop, but not be able to make out what your partner is saying. You’re born with tiny hairs called cilia in your inner ear that move when sound waves are present. Nerves translate the movement of these tiny hairs into information that goes to your brain where it gets interpreted into distinct sounds and frequencies.

The better the movements are interpreted, the more easily you’re able to hear distinctions between sounds such as “D” and “T” or hear letters like “S”, “H” and “F”. Unfortunately, the cilia are extremely delicate and can be harmed by loud noise or other trauma.

Cilia also help your brain determine how loud a sound is, where it’s coming from, and how far away it is.

The Most Common Causes of Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss happens when these tiny hairs are damaged. Often, this type of hearing loss is gradual, which is why many people associate it with aging. It’s thought that animals are able to regrow these hairs and regain their hearing when their cilia get damaged, but humans don’t seem to have this ability naturally.

Common causes of sensorineural hearing loss are:

Loud sounds
Head injuries or other trauma
Diseases like diabetes or autoimmune disease
High blood pressure
Some medications
How to Deal with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
While there are no current medical treatments to heal cilia, you can successfully address sensorineural hearing loss with hearing technology such as hearing aids.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Fine-Tuning Your Hearing Aid

Even when customizing the settings to your hearing profile there will be a period of adjustment with your new hearing aids. Your brain will need some time to relearn how to process sounds it hasn’t heard in a while. The worse the hearing loss, the longer this process typically takes.

The first few weeks you should practice using your hearing aids in different environments and by listening to audio recordings of books while you read the words. This will help your brain re-acquaint itself with processing sounds into words.

During this adjustment period also make note of any environments or circumstances where the hearing aid didn’t work as expected or was not comfortable. We’ll be able to help you tweak your hearing aids until they give you the sound quality and performance you’re expecting.

Questions?

Talk to the experts.

Call us today.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Why wait? You don’t have to live with hearing loss.

Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss is fairly common and might explain why you can hear a pin drop, but not be able to make out what your partner is saying. You’re born with tiny hairs called cilia in your inner ear that move when sound waves are present. Nerves translate the movement of these tiny hairs into information that goes to your brain where it gets interpreted into distinct sounds and frequencies.

The better the movements are interpreted, the more easily you’re able to hear distinctions between sounds such as “D” and “T” or hear letters like “S”, “H” and “F”. Unfortunately, the cilia are extremely delicate and can be harmed by loud noise or other trauma.

Cilia also help your brain determine how loud a sound is, where it’s coming from, and how far away it is.

The Most Common Causes of Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Sensorineural hearing loss happens when these tiny hairs are damaged. Often, this type of hearing loss is gradual, which is why many people associate it with aging. It’s thought that animals are able to regrow these hairs and regain their hearing when their cilia get damaged, but humans don’t seem to have this ability naturally.

Common causes of sensorineural hearing loss are:

Loud sounds
Head injuries or other trauma
Diseases like diabetes or autoimmune disease
High blood pressure
Some medications
How to Deal with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
While there are no current medical treatments to heal cilia, you can successfully address sensorineural hearing loss with hearing technology such as hearing aids.

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